Xin Quan M.D.
Xin Quan M.D.

Xin Quan Medical Rehabilitation and Acupuncture, PLLC

Xin Quan Medical Rehabilitation and Acupuncture, PLLC

33 Barker Ave. Prof. Unit #2

White Plains, NY 10601

Tel: 914-285-3480  |  Fax: 914-285-3479

33 Barker Ave. Prof. Unit #2

White Plains, NY 10601

Tel: 914-285-3480  |  Fax: 914-285-3479

About

Quan Xin M.D. Profile
  • Xin Quan, MD
  • Graduate of Beijing University Health Science Center (also known as Beijing Medical University), China.
  • Diplomat American Board of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation.
  • Diplomat American Board of Electrodiagnostic Medicine.
  • Certified in Medical Acupuncture.
  • Listed in National Register's Who's Who in Executives and Professionals, 2005.
  • American's Top Physicians, 2010.

Scope of Practice

Comprehensive evaluation and broad spectrum of non- surgical treatment for various musculoskeletal and neurological conditions. Treatment options include:

  • Peripheral steroid injection
    • Muscle Trigger Point
    • Trigger finger
    • Carpal tunnel
    • Plantar fascia
    • Tendonitis
    • Bursitis
    • All peripheral joints
  • Intra-articular hyaluronan injection
    • Synvisc
    • Hyalgan
    • Orthovisc
    • Euflexxa
  • Nerve conduction study & EMG
    • Carpal tunnel syndrome
    • Peripheral nerve injury
    • Peripheral polyneuropathy
    • Cervical or lumbar radiculopathy
    • Brachial or lumbar sacral plexopathy
    • Bellâ��s palsy
    • Myasthenia gravis
  • Physical Therapy & Acupuncture
    • Neck pain
    • Back pain
    • Fibromyalgia
    • Joint pain
    • Tendonitis
    • Neuropathy
    • Bellâ��s palsy
    • Shingle pain (postherpetic neuralgia)
    • Stroke
    • Spinal cord injury
    • Traumatic brain injury
    • Cancer supportive treatment
    • Seasonal allergy
    • Headache
  • Orthotic and prosthetic prescription and management
    • Pes Plano valgus
    • Plantar fasciatis
    • Metatarsalgia
    • Lumbar brace
    • Knee brace
    • Hand and wrist brace

Conditions Treated

  • Neck Pain
    • Neck strain
    • Myofascial pain
    • Degenerative disc disease
    • Spinal stenosis
    • Disc herniation
    • Cervical radiculopathy
  • Lower back pain
    • Lumbar strain
    • Myofascial pain
    • Degenerative disc disease
    • Spinal stenosis
    • Disc herniation
    • Lumbar radiculopathy
  • Sports, work related, or chronic soft tissue injury
    • Tennis elbow
    • Golfer's elbow
    • Runner's knee
    • New mom's thumb
    • Shoulder rotator cuff tendonitis
    • Frozen shoulder
    • Ligament sprain
    • Piriformis syndrome
    • Bursitis
    • Meniscus tear
    • Plantar fasciitis
    • Achilles tendonitis
  • Joint pain and swelling
    • Osteoarthritis
    • Rheumatic arthritis
    • Gouty arthritis
    • Psoriatic arthritis
  • Pain and numbness
    • Carpel tunnel syndrome
    • Cubital tunnel syndrome
    • Post herpetic neuralgia
    • Trigeminal neuralgia
    • Cervical radiculopathy
    • Lumbar radiculopathy
    • Neuralgia parathetica
    • Occipital neuralgia
    • Peripheral polyneuropathy
    • Fibromyalgia
  • Muscle Weakness
    • Stroke
    • Brain injury
    • Bell's palsy
    • Multiple sclerosis
    • Spinal cord injury
    • Guillain-Barre syndrome
  • Movement disorder
    • Parkinson's disease
    • ALS
    • Multiple sclerosis
    • Spinal cord injury
    • Brain injury
  • Cancer Rehabilitation
    • Side effect from chemo or radiation therapy
  • Post-surgical rehabilitation
    • Orthopedic surgery
    • Neurosurgery
  • Seasonal allergy
  • Insomnia
  • Migraine Headache

FAQ

  • What is Acupuncture?
  • Originating in China more than 2,000 years ago, acupuncture began to become better known in the United States in 1971, when New York Times reporter James Reston wrote about how doctors in China used needles to ease his pain after surgery. The term acupuncture describes a family of procedures involving stimulation of anatomical points on the body by a variety of techniques. These points have been mapped by the Chinese over a period of two thousand years. The acupuncture technique that has been most studied scientifically involves penetrating the skin with thin, solid, metallic needles that are manipulated by the hands or by electrical stimulation.
  • How does acupuncture work?
  • Traditional acupuncture is based on ancient Chinese theories of the flow of Qi (energy) and Xue (blood) through distinct meridians or channels that cover the body somewhat like the nerves and blood vessels do. According to ancient theory, acupuncture allows Qi to flow to areas where it is Deficient and away from those where it is Excess. In this way, acupuncture regulates and restores the harmonious energetic balance of the body. In Chinese medicine, it is commonly referred to, "Pain originates from the blockage of free flow".
  • Does acupuncture hurt?
  • The patient should feel some cramping, heaviness, distention and tingling or electric sensation either around the needle or traveling up or down the affected meridian or channel. In any case, the experience of any discomfort is usually mild and disappears when the needle is removed
  • Are needles clean?
  • The needles are sterile, individually packaged, disposable needles.
  • How many treatments will a patient need?
  • That depends upon the duration, severity, and nature of the specific complaint. A series of five to fifteen treatments may resolve many chronic problems. Some degenerative conditions may require many treatments over time. Normally, a patient is given a "treatment break" of two weeks after ten sessions. Afterwards, the new treatment plan will be implanted based on the re-evaluation.
  • Is there anything a patient needs to do before receiving an acupuncture treatment?
  • 1) Maintain good personal hygiene to reduce the possibility of bacterial infection.

    2) Avoid treatment when excessively fatigued, hungry, or shortly after a full meal.

  • Is there anything a patient needs to do while receiving an acupuncture treatment?
  • 1) Relax. There is no need to be frightened. Ask any questions you have along the way so that you can get the most benefit from the treatment.

    2) Do not change your position or move suddenly. If you are uncomfortable, please call for help.

Accepted Insurance Plans

  • Aetna
  • Beechstreet
  • Blue-Cross & Blue Shield
  • Cigna
  • Connecticare
  • Empire Plan
  • Healthnet
  • Medicare
  • Oxford
  • Pomco
  • United Healthcare
  • 1199
  • Workman's Compensation
  • No Fault

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